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Creationist radiocarbon dating

The Triceratops brow horn was excavated in May 2012 and stored at the Glendive Dinosaur and Fossil Museum.The Museum, which has since 2005 been in cooperation with the Paleochronology Group, a team of consultants in geology, paleontology, chemistry, engineering, and education, sent a sample of the outer portion of the Triceratops brow horn to Head of the Paleochronology Group Hugh Miller, at his request, in order to carry out Carbon-14 dating.

“I organized the Paleochronology group in 2003 to fill a void with regards fossil wood and dinosaur bones as I was curious as to their age by C-14 dating.All are based on the same types of calculations and assumptions used by evolutionists on the very few systems (uranium, potassium, rubidium) whose radioactive decay seems to indicate ages in the billions of years.As noted in items 25 and 26 in Table I, even these methods (when based on real empirical evidence) yield young ages.Nevertheless, all things considered, it seems that those ages on the low end of the spectrum are likely to be more accurate than those on the high end.This conclusion follows from the obvious fact that: (1) they are less likely to have been affected by initial concentrations or positions other than “zero”; (2) the assumption that the system was a “closed system” is more likely to be valid for a short time than for a long time; (3) the assumption that the process rate was constant is also more likely to be valid for a short time than for a long time.An inspection of the reference lists provided by Morris (93, 95) and Morris and Parker (97) shows that most of the calculations were done and published by Morris and his colleagues.

Those calculations that are attributed to scientific journals do not actually appear there but, instead, represent unjustified interpretations by creationists of legitimate scientific data.

In addition, Morris (95) and Morris and Parker (97) draw an unwarranted parallel between their calculations and radiometric dating.

Most of their “ages” rely on the assumption of constant rates for processes known to vary.

Mr Miller sent the sample to the University of Georgia, Center for Applied Isotope Studies, for this purpose.

The sample was divided at the lab into two fractions with the “bulk” or collagen break down products yielding an age of 33,570 ± 120 years and the carbonate fraction of bone bioapatite yielding an age of 41,010 ± 220 years [UGAMS-11752 & 11752a].

In the March 2005 issue of Science , paleontologist Mary Schweitzer and her team announced the discovery of soft tissue inside a 68-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex leg bone from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana, a controversial finding considering scientists had thought soft tissue proteins degrade in less than 1 million years in the best of conditions.