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Dating traditions in china

Moments from some shows have gone viral, with many emphasizing materialistic values.In 2010, an unemployed male suitor on asked a female contestant if she’d go on a bike ride with him for a date.

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At the same time, traditional courtship and marriage rituals were evaporating.It was essentially a singles ad broadcast before audience members, who, if interested, could contact the candidate for a date.Despite all the limitations, the show was a groundbreaking depiction of courtship.It took decisions about love and marriage from the private home to the very public domain of broadcast TV.For Chinese romance, this was its own “great leap forward.” By the early 1990s, Chinese TV networks found themselves in fierce competition with one another. For single people, they’re a platform for seeking potential spouses; for fans, they’re the subject of gossip and dissection; for the cultural elites, they’re a topic for derision; and for the government, they’re a target for surveillance.

Compared with western cultures, China has traditionally had a vastly different value system toward marriages and family.

Marriage was viewed as a contract between two households, and it was for the purpose of procreation, not love.

Thought to contribute to peace and stability, it was the dominant custom into the latter half of the 20th century.

For example, in 1970, only 1.8% of couples lived together before marriage. Meanwhile, divorces in China rose from 170,449 couples in 1978 to 3.5 million in 2013, while marriages with foreigners increased from fewer than 8,500 couples in 1979 to more than 49,000 couples in 2010.

There have been some consequences to this shift: As TV became more commercialized, so, too, did love and marriage.

And it was a far cry from a dating show that purported to “serve the people.” Not surprisingly, widespread outcry only augmented the fame of the shows and their contestants, and SARFT—China’s State Administration of Radio, Film, and Television—eventually took action.